Posted 4 days ago

stick-em-with-the-pointy-end:

coconutchris:

superwholockmervenger:

☼ Hufflepuff Common Room

“It was round, earthy and low-ceilinged; it always felt sunny, and its circular windows had a view of rippling grass and dandelions. There was a lot of burnished copper about the place, and many plants, which either hang from the ceiling or sat on the windowsills. The overstuffed sofas and chairs were upholstered in yellow and black, and the dormitories were reached through round doors in the walls of the common room. Copper lamps cast a warm light over the four-poster beds, which were covered in patchwork quilts, and small copper bed warmers hung on the walls, in case of cold feet.”

This is so beautiful and I’m not even a hufflepuff.

(Source: letassi)

Posted 4 days ago

ATTENTION! STOP SCROLLING PLEASE!!!

bard-of-dild0s:

I’m trying to prove a point to someone that using the pronouns of someone’s designated sex and not the ones that they prefer until they get a sex change (or whatever) is offensive and if said people find it offensive they are not just being ‘touchy’ or ‘overreacting’

reblog and like this post if you think the above is true. 

here is the post for if you do think that they are being touchy

thank you!!

Posted 4 days ago
Posted 4 days ago

18mr:

“When thinking of iconic romance, ask yourself if any imagery (paintings, photographs, film-stills) comes to mind that is not showing heterosexual couples? Probably not,” says photographer Braden Summers of his photo series of everyday gay and lesbian couples from around the globe.

[x]

Posted 4 days ago

kaytara-art:

hideback:

Abandoned.

…Near the village of Braachaat, outside Antwerp, Belgium. The last photo shows a grotto-like cave under the mansion that may have been used as a bar in the past.

Whoa.

Posted 5 days ago

persephoneholly:

lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.

One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.

However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.

All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:

Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:

I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this particular video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

I don’t like Taylor Swift but holy shit this needed to be said.

Posted 5 days ago

the-tv-light:

also-a-noun:

s-assypants:

fiedbach:

snowyanna:

215-to-fit:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.

My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.

My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.

My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.

My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.

My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.

My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.

The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Fun story time. I loved to read. So much so, I was reading chapter books in kindergarden. I broke the record for reading points in elementary school. They actually had to start making up prizes for me. No one in the history of the school had ever read so many books in a year. Basically, my class liked me because I won those suckers pizza parties in my spare time.

In second grade, I had a teacher named Ms. Mobley who believed all children should be average. She flat out told my father that all children should make C’s, and should never strive for more than that.

Not only was she insane, she also would routinely spell things wrong for us to copy for our spelling tests. Later, when we spelled those words wrong on the test, she would mark us off. Yes, our own teacher was sabotaging us.

I should have been tested for gifted classes, but I was not. Why? Ms. Mobley didn’t believe in “gifted” children.

This teacher had tenure and could not be fired.

Never forget.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

George Orwell couldn’t invent this shit

it’s twisted stuff

this is important.

THIS ISN’T JUST THE AMERICAN SCHOOL SYSTEM.

Trust me, the British school system is JUST like this.

When I was three, I got in trouble for reading fully chaptered books aimed at older kids (Harry Potter) instead of picture books.

When I was four, I got shouted at for knowing all the words on the spelling list for the year already, because I’d been writing relatively fluently at three.

When I was five, I got told off for using cursive, because at my school they didn’t teach it until we were 6.

When I was 8 I got in trouble for reading classical novels such as ‘Little Women’ and ‘Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm’ because they ‘weren’t age appropriate’. MOST OF THEM WERE ORIGINALLY AIMED AT CHILDREN.

When I was ten, I got in trouble for having already read the class book and for referencing future chapters that we hadn’t read as a class in my essay.

When I was 12, in my first French class, I got told off because I already knew the basics as I’d independently taken a course in French when I was 8.

Recently, age 14, I got told off for ‘arguing’ when my teacher claimed that Jesse Owens wasn’t given his medals by Hitler just because he was black. This is wrong, which is what I wrote on one of the questions about it.

School systems do not like children to be above average, because they have to cater for them separately from the other children which takes time. Trust me, this isn’t just an American issue.

Something you might find interesting is that Marxist sociological theory claims that state schools are essential in maintaining capitalism. While private schools produce the politicians and CEOs (bourgeoisie), state schools must produce a capable but unquestioning work force (proletariat). According to this theory, school is meant to keep you perfectly average so that you all can do nothing but compete for the same mediocre or low paying jobs to keep the capitalist system running.

Posted 1 week ago

To all the writers that ever were:

lydiascreams:

Posted 1 week ago

But when I was doing the scene, [director] Alex Graves said “When you say that last line, ‘I can be your family,’ say it like ‘I love you.’” And that’s the take that they used. –Maisie Wiliams (x)

(Source: annies-crestas)

Posted 1 week ago

swaggaliciouspancake:

danysbitchface:

night-vale-secretpolice:

night-vale-secretpolice:

When I used to think about Voldemort’s horcruxes I imagined a soul divided in equal portions residing in the different horcruxes and Voldemort himself. I realised that this can’t be true in The Half-Blood Prince Slughorn describes making a horcrux as splitting ones soul in two. This means that when Riddle made his Diary into a horcrux he split his soul in half and physically removed one half from his body and placed it in the diary. This means that he only had half of his soul left when he made his next horcrux, Marvolo’s ring. This half would have been split in half leaving only a quarter in Voldemort’s body. This goes on and on the amount of soul remaining in Voldemort halving each time he makes a horcrux until he had only 1/128 or 0.78125% left in his body.  As shown in the graph above.  So next time you wonder why Voldemort could have done some of things he did, remember how little human he had left in him. I don’t know about you but I think that this is crazy.

Come on guys, I didn’t do maths for 14 notes

 (via riversonglife)

 Harry has more Voldemort in him than Voldemort